Questions

Can you charge editorial and advertising fees for your in house blog/magazine?

The blog exists for inbound marketing purposes but also covers other topics under the travel umbrella - hotel/sights etc. Do you get to charge ad rates if it's not main media business? Ad charges as in for promoting posts/social media/newsletter pushout

3answers

You can definitely monetize your content charging an adequate ad rate. I would suggest to explore this option mostly after having built a relevant, unique and value added blog. If you manage to get qualified traffic to your blog (you can check this using any Analytics platform), you can then try to monetize this traffic, charging ad rates.

There can be several ways of tapping this opportunity, from selling advertising space via networks up to private marketplaces.


Answered 22 days ago

Content monitization completely depends on the traffic that you are getting, because without traffic analysis it will be blind attempt. So first analyse your current traffic then you can explore monitization platforms like Google Adsense etc or even you can go with affiliate offers that will give you some good bucks😎


Answered 21 days ago

Plenty of other sites do it, so you should too.

One way to see if your site/magazine is ready is by putting together a media kit (some examples: https://monetizepros.com/ad-sales/seven-examples-of-media-kits-that-make-it-rain/). It is a professional way of touting your reach (impressions, unique visitors, etc.), putting together potential advertising packages, and showing your proactiveness. Many blogs aren't prepared when the first advertiser reaches out and can subsequently undervalue their media spaces because they haven't done the research yet.

Once you do that, add a page (e.g. "Advertise") to your site. It can be in your main nav or as a subpage to "Contact Us".

Some things to keep in mind:

- Social posts should include a "paid promotion" reference or "#ad". If it's on your site, you'll need a disclaimer about paid ads and affiliate links. Those are best above the fold of your site. Otherwise, you can get fined by the FTC for not disclosing that you're getting paid for your recommendation. You can email me at jessica@getrock.it and I'll send you some free disclaimer examples.

- You should only work with advertisers you would endorse regardless of pay or free products. No one, especially your audience, likes feeling duped.

- If something goes wrong, either directly with your partnership or allegations against the company surface, be honest with your audience. Write to them about how you -- with the best information you had at the time -- partnered with the company but can no longer do so in good faith. Remind them that you only endorse products that you have or would use. Then apologize to your audience for any wrong it caused and direct them to resources if people were injured.

Best of luck!
Jessica Ma


Answered 21 days ago

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